In 2011, Philips engineers tinkered with the remote phosphor technology that can convert blue light into a more appealing indoor light, but to do that, they needed to use more LED diodes. The traditional bulb shape made it such that they had to cluster the diodes together closely. One problem: LEDs get hot quickly, and overheating can cut down on the bulb’s longevity. Engineers, then, had to add a heavy metal heat sink to the bulb’s base to draw away heat. That addition made the bulbs more expensive.

But by flattening the bulb, Philips has eliminated the need for a heat sink.

In 2011, Philips engineers tinkered with the remote phosphor technology that can convert blue light into a more appealing indoor light, but to do that, they needed to use more LED diodes. The traditional bulb shape made it such that they had to cluster the diodes together closely. One problem: LEDs get hot quickly, and overheating can cut down on the bulb’s longevity. Engineers, then, had to add a heavy metal heat sink to the bulb’s base to draw away heat. That addition made the bulbs more expensive.

But by flattening the bulb, Philips has eliminated the need for a heat sink.